Iron Duke is a computer moderated rule system. What that means is that you still play your wargame with figures (or counters if you prefer) aided by a computer program. The program keeps track of the casualties, fatigue and morale for all your units.

Iron Duke - Introduction

Napoleon inspecting the troopsIron Duke is a Napoleonic simulation where the heavy number crunching is done by a computer and the wargamers are left to concentrate on tactics. This allows the program to have more details built-in than is possible with in a printed rule set, and yet simplifying the task of the player. It also allows more "fog of war" to be built-in to the rules than with a printed rule set.

Read more...

Battle Report - 23-May-08

080523ironduke01The battle chosen to test out the Iron Duke system was based around the battle of Brienne in early 1814. To keep numbers manageable, a subset of troops from the real order of battle (OOB) was used.

 

Iron Duke is a computer moderated wargame. Bit of a mouthful, but what this means is that a computer program keeps track of formations, casualties, fatigue and morale while the player concentrates on command decisions and moving their figures on the tabletop. The figures are used to determine which units can fire or charge enemy units.

Read more...

Iron Duke - Army Lists

 Army lists to download to suit the Iron Duke Napoleonic rules. The army lists are stored on the computer and can be modified for different battles. The lists include the troops (infantry, cavalry and artillery) as well as the commanders. They are organised into the correct structure. Having these lists speeds up the organisation of a battle.

Read more...

Iron Duke - Scales

080523ironduke46

An Iron Duke Napoleonic battle in progress at NWAThis article explains the basic unit sizes, figure scales, ground scales and time scales which can be used with the Iron Duke computer moderated game. The system is flexible and it is possible to change time scales during the game. This is very useful for moving quickly through the opening moves and then getting into shorter time periods when the action gets "up close and personal".

Read more...